•  
  • Blog
  • Archives for Kindergarten (131)

Westfield Girl Scout Troop 40056 offering ‘Fun in Scouts’ after-school program

Eighth grade Girl Scouts Heart of New Jersey Cadette Troop 40056 at Edison Intermediate School in Westfield, is offering “Fun with Scouts,” an after-school enrichment program for Westfield girls in kindergarten through second grade. Girl Scout membership is not required to participate in this program. There will be two, 5-week sessions in which girls will participate in an array of different theme-based activities each week, including games, arts and crafts, stories and more.

Enrollment is limited to 20 girls each week. Girls can enroll in up to five weeks. Registration is $10 per week, and is due at least one week before the program date. The program will be held at Edison Intermediate School. Participation in this program does not lead to Girl Scout membership.

Session 1: Kindergarten – Thursdays, March 6, March 13, March 20, March 27, April 3, 3:30-4:30 p.m.

Session 2: First and second grade – Mondays, April 28, May 5, May 12, May 19, June 2, 3:30-4:30 p.m.

For registration information, email Charlotte Lee, at cflee4@verizon.net.

Girl Scouts Heart of New Jersey (GSHNJ) serves more than 25,000 girls, ages 5-17 and 11, 000 adult members in the counties of Hudson, Essex, Union, Somerset, Hunterdon, southern Warren and parts of Middlesex.

For more information about how to become a Girl Scout, volunteering or donating, visit gshnj.org.

Article source: http://www.nj.com/suburbannews/index.ssf/2014/02/westfield_girl_scout_troop_400.html

Early bird fees available for After School Program

Take advantage of the “Early Bird” rates by registering before Feb. 12 for the 20132014 Sanibel Recreation Center After School Program Spring Trimester.

The After School program runs Monday through Friday from 2:10-5:00 p.m. throughout the school year. It is available for children ages kindergarten through sixth grade. Every child registered in the After School Program will receive a one year complimentary membership to the Recreation Center. This membership can be upgraded to a family membership for an additional $50. Offered again this year will be trimester payment options. The After School Program registration fees are as follows:

Spring Trimester, Feb. 19-May 28:

Early Bird Rates: Members $176 and Non-Members $211. Register by Feb. 12.

After Early Bird Rates: Members $211 and Non-Members $253. Register on or after Feb. 13.

A supervised seventh and eighth grade program is also available Monday through Friday from 2:10-5:00 p.m. throughout the school year with the purchase of a Recreation Center membership.

Financial assistance is available to families of program participants based upon individual need. For more information, call the Sanibel Recreation Center at 472-0345.

The Sanibel Recreation Center is located at 3880 Sanibel-Captiva Road. Daily, weekly, semi-annual and annual memberships are available. For more information call the Sanibel Recreation Center at 472-0345 or visit our web site at mysanibel.com.

Article source: http://www.captivacurrent.com/page/content.detail/id/523261/Early-bird-fees-available-for-After-School-Program.html?nav=5053

Buffalo after-school programs get big lift as district partners with Say Yes

WASHINGTON – Buffalo’s public schools and Say Yes to Education are partnering in an effort to dramatically bolster after-school programs at half of the city’s 56 schools this fall, transforming the sessions from mere help on homework to a comprehensive extension of the school day aimed at ensuring each student’s educational success.

Say Yes Buffalo announced its involvement in the program at a news conference on Capitol Hill where the organization – which aims to pay for college for underprivileged city school graduates – unveiled a four-year, $4.5 million grant from the Wallace Foundation. The money will be used, in part, to develop a system that tracks student progress.

Meanwhile, the Buffalo School District has assembled $14 million in funding, most of it through various grants, to put together the new after-school partnership with Say Yes this year.

The program, which covers kindergarten through 12th grade, will be expanded to 75 percent of city schools next year and to all of the city’s schools in 2015.

“The concept of the program this year is to meet the needs of our children so they’ll be more college – and career-ready – academically, socially and emotionally – while meeting the needs of parents who are working, who need that after-school care,” said Casandra Wright, chief of school leadership for the district.

Say Yes, a nationwide nonprofit organization, started its Buffalo operations in 2012 by offering full-tuition scholarships to qualified city students.

But Say Yes officials said their involvement in the after-school expansion fits perfectly with their organization’s mission.

“Say Yes is really about cradle to career,” said David P. Rust, executive director of Say Yes Buffalo. “We want to get to you early and see you through to college so that you succeed.”

The new after-school programs will be much like an extension of the school day, with extended learning programs combined with tutoring and hands-on learning.

“There will be a seamless transition from the daytime school component to the after-school component, and that is new,” Wright said.

For example, Rust said: “If you’re learning about the ecosystem in science class, you will be growing tomatoes and carrots after school in the garden.”

Principals will design the new after-school programs to fit their student populations, and Say Yes will provide facilitators at each school to ease the transition from official classroom time to the after-school efforts.

But that’s only part of the reinvented after-school program. Leadership skills, public speaking, diversity training and recreation also could be included, Wright said.

Meanwhile, high school students will find help available for preparing for their SAT or ACT exams.

In other words, it’s a total reinvention of the current after-school programs, which mostly entail homework assistance and which are not available to all students.

“These are two- to three-hour extended school day programs, at no cost to participants, with transportation home provided,” Rust added.

What’s more, the city’s summer school programs will be remodeled along the same lines starting next year.

And Say Yes will be monitoring student progress through it all. With the aid of the Wallace grant – which also will fund professional development and communications efforts – Say Yes Buffalo will design a student-monitoring system that looks not just at grades, but at everything that can be used to measure each student’s progress.

“The student management system is the first of its kind in the country,” Rust said. “It’s very comprehensive,” tracking student progress in the after-school programs, as well as during the school day.

Alphonso O’Neil-White, former president of BlueCross BlueShield of Western New York and a key figure in bringing the Say Yes program to Buffalo, said the expansion into city school operations is a cooperative effort that has involved the schools, the teachers union, principals and other interested parties.

Such community support and cooperation is unprecedented, O’Neil-White said.

“I haven’t seen anything like it anywhere,” he added. “I think it’s the only way we’re going to get any reform in this district.”

Rust said the after-school programs will launch in half of the district’s schools in November. Those schools are: School 81, Bennett High School, Bennett Park Montessori, Bilingual Center 33, Dr. George Blackman Early Childhood Center, D’Youville Porter Campus School, East High School, Emerson School of Hospitality, Early Childhood Center 17, International Prep, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Multicultural Institute, Native American Magnet and Frederick Law Olmsted School 156.

Also: the Academy School, Buffalo Elementary School of Technology, Community School 53, Discovery School 67, Early Childhood Center 82, Highgate Heights Elementary, Hillery Park Elementary, Hutch-Tech, McKinley High School, Frederick Law Olmsted School 64, Southside Elementary, Waterfront Elementary, West Hertel Academy and Dr. Lydia T. Wright School of Excellence.

In addition to announcing the grant to the Buffalo program, Say Yes announced that 11 additional private colleges and universities have joined the organization’s Higher Education Compact, which offers free tuition to eligible students.

The 11 new institutions are Cornell University, Hamilton College, Paul Smith’s College, Dartmouth College, Princeton University, Rice University, Pomona College, Denison University, Rhodes College, the University of the South and Vanderbilt University.

The addition of the new schools brings the number of institutions offering free tuition under Say Yes to 54. Local institutions that take part include Medaille College, Villa Maria College, Daemen College, D’Youville College, Hilbert College, Canisius College, Trocaire College and St. Bonaventure University.

Seventy-four colleges and universities in the State University of New York and City University of New York systems also participate.

News Staff Reporter Mary B. Pasciak contributed to this report. email: jzremski@buffnews.com

Article source: http://www.buffalonews.com/city-region/buffalo-public-schools/buffalo-after-school-programs-get-big-lift-as-district-partners-with-say-yes-20130918

Buffalo Public Schools, Say Yes to Education partnering on after-school programs

WASHINGTON – Buffalo’s public schools and Say Yes to Education are partnering in an effort to dramatically bolster after-school programs at half of the city’s 56 schools this fall, transforming the sessions from mere help on homework to a comprehensive extension of the school day aimed at ensuring each student’s educational success.

Say Yes Buffalo announced its involvement in the program at a news conference on Capitol Hill where the organization – which aims to pay for college for underprivileged city school graduates – unveiled a four-year, $4.5 million grant from the Wallace Foundation. The money will be used, in part, to develop a system that tracks student progress.

Meanwhile, the Buffalo School District has assembled $14 million in funding, most of it through various grants, to put together the new after-school partnership with Say Yes this year.

The program, which covers kindergarten through 12th grade, will be expanded to 75 percent of city schools next year and to all of the city’s schools in 2015.

“The concept of the program this year is to meet the needs of our children so they’ll be more college – and career-ready – academically, socially and emotionally – while meeting the needs of parents who are working, who need that after-school care,” said Casandra Wright, chief of school leadership for the district.

Say Yes, a nationwide nonprofit organization, started its Buffalo operations in 2012 by offering full-tuition scholarships to qualified city students.

But Say Yes officials said their involvement in the after-school expansion fits perfectly with their organization’s mission.

“Say Yes is really about cradle to career,” said David P. Rust, executive director of Say Yes Buffalo. “We want to get to you early and see you through to college so that you succeed.”

The new after-school programs will be much like an extension of the school day, with extended learning programs combined with tutoring and hands-on learning.

“There will be a seamless transition from the daytime school component to the after-school component, and that is new,” Wright said.

For example, Rust said: “If you’re learning about the ecosystem in science class, you will be growing tomatoes and carrots after school in the garden.”

Principals will design the new after-school programs to fit their student populations, and Say Yes will provide facilitators at each school to ease the transition from official classroom time to the after-school efforts.

But that’s only part of the reinvented after-school program. Leadership skills, public speaking, diversity training and recreation also could be included, Wright said.

Meanwhile, high school students will find help available for preparing for their SAT or ACT exams.

In other words, it’s a total reinvention of the current after-school programs, which mostly entail homework assistance and which are not available to all students.

“These are two- to three-hour extended school day programs, at no cost to participants, with transportation home provided,” Rust added.

What’s more, the city’s summer school programs will be remodeled along the same lines starting next year.

And Say Yes will be monitoring student progress through it all. With the aid of the Wallace grant – which also will fund professional development and communications efforts – Say Yes Buffalo will design a student-monitoring system that looks not just at grades, but at everything that can be used to measure each student’s progress.

“The student management system is the first of its kind in the country,” Rust said. “It’s very comprehensive,” tracking student progress in the after-school programs, as well as during the school day.

Alphonso O’Neil-White, former president of BlueCross BlueShield of Western New York and a key figure in bringing the Say Yes program to Buffalo, said the expansion into city school operations is a cooperative effort that has involved the schools, the teachers union, principals and other interested parties.

Such community support and cooperation is unprecedented, O’Neil-White said.

“I haven’t seen anything like it anywhere,” he added. “I think it’s the only way we’re going to get any reform in this district.”

Rust said the after-school programs will launch in half of the district’s schools in November. Those schools are: School 81, Bennett High School, Bennett Park Montessori, Bilingual Center 33, Dr. George Blackman Early Childhood Center, D’Youville Porter Campus School, East High School, Emerson School of Hospitality, Early Childhood Center 17, International Prep, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Multicultural Institute, Native American Magnet and Frederick Law Olmsted School 156.

Also: the Academy School, Buffalo Elementary School of Technology, Community School 53, Discovery School 67, Early Childhood Center 82, Highgate Heights Elementary, Hillery Park Elementary, Hutch-Tech, McKinley High School, Frederick Law Olmsted School 64, Southside Elementary, Waterfront Elementary, West Hertel Academy and Dr. Lydia T. Wright School of Excellence.

In addition to announcing the grant to the Buffalo program, Say Yes announced that 11 additional private colleges and universities have joined the organization’s Higher Education Compact, which offers free tuition to eligible students.

The 11 new institutions are Cornell University, Hamilton College, Paul Smith’s College, Dartmouth College, Princeton University, Rice University, Pomona College, Denison University, Rhodes College, the University of the South and Vanderbilt University.

The addition of the new schools brings the number of institutions offering free tuition under Say Yes to 54. Local institutions that take part include Medaille College, Villa Maria College, Daemen College, D’Youville College, Hilbert College, Canisius College, Trocaire College and St. Bonaventure University.

Seventy-four colleges and universities in the State University of New York and City University of New York systems also participate.

News Staff Reporter Mary B. Pasciak contributed to this report. email: jzremski@buffnews.com

Article source: http://www.buffalonews.com/city-region/buffalo-public-schools/buffalo-public-schools-say-yes-to-education-partnering-on-after-school-programs-20130918

Say Yes Buffalo to start after-school and summer learning programs for students

WASHINGTON – The Buffalo Say Yes program, which aims to pay for college for underprivileged city school graduates, announced today that it will start a sweeping after-school and summer learning program in the city thanks to a four-year, $4.5 million grant from the Wallace Foundation.

The after-school programs, for students from kindergarten through 12th grade, will be available in half of all city schools starting this fall. Say Yes hopes the programs will eventually benefit 60 percent of city school students.

The grant will also be used to fund development of community-based organizations aimed at promoting education.

The after-school and summer programs in Buffalo mark a dramatic expansion for Say Yes.

Say Yes officials said the expansion is central to their organization’s mission.

“Say Yes is really about cradle to career,” said David Rust, executive director of Say Yes Buffalo. “We want to get to you early and see you through to college so that you succeed.”

The national nonprofit Wallace Foundation, based in New York City, strives to improve education for disadvantaged children. The organization previously funded a similar grant for students in Syracuse.

“We are most grateful to Wallace for having partnered with Say Yes … over the last three years,” said Mary Anne Schmitt-Carey, the president of Say Yes to Education Inc., the national organization that brought its program to the Buffalo schools last year. “This grant will support and advance our shared commitment to providing children in cities with access to educational excellence and opportunity regardless of their background.”

Say Yes announced the grant at a Capitol Hill press conference where Sen. Kirsten E. Gillibrand, D-N.Y., extolled the expansion of the program to Buffalo.

“I am delighted that Buffalo has been added,” she said. “Buffalo has so much potential now.”

In addition to announcing the grant to the Buffalo program, Say Yes announced that 11 additional private colleges and universities have joined the organization’s Higher Education Compact, which offers free tuition to eligible students.

The 11 new institutions are Cornell University, Hamilton College, Paul Smith’s College, Dartmouth College, Princeton University, Rice University, Pomona College, Denison University, Rhodes College, The University of the South and Vanderbilt University.

The addition of the new schools brings the number of institutions offering free tuition under Say Yes to 54. Local institutions that take part include Medaille College, Villa Maria College, Daemen College, D’Youville College, Hilbert College, Canisius College, Trocaire College and St. Bonaventure University.

Email: jzremski@buffnews.com

Article source: http://www.buffalonews.com/city-region/buffalo-public-schools/say-yes-buffalo-to-start-after-school-and-summer-learning-programs-for-students-20130918

Scholarships available for after school program in Crystal River

Some Citrus County students may have a chance to get some help with their education.

The Spot Family Center of Crystal River helps students with classwork, provides outdoor fun, and offers computer lab space.

There are now 10 scholarships available for an after school enrichment program through the center that serves students in kindergarten through 7th grade.

The program runs the entire school year, on Mondays through Fridays from 3-6 p.m.  On scheduled early dismissal days, the hours are 12:30-6 p.m. Bus transportation is available from Crystal River Primary and Middle schools to the center.

Scholarships are first-come first-serve to local families who qualify. That includes families who receive free or reduced lunch.

Applications for the scholarships can be picked up at the Spot Family Center’s headquarters, which is located at 405 S.E. Seventh Avenue in Crystal River. 

Article source: http://www.baynews9.com/content/news/baynews9/news/article.html/content/news/articles/bn9/2013/9/17/scholarships_availab.html

LGBTQ Catholic school students fight to get club recognition

LGBTQ Catholic school students fight to get club recognition

LGBTQ students and allies in Catholic high schools in the Seattle area are beginning to speak out, demanding the ability to form official on-campus groups, or Gay Straight Alliance (GSA) clubs.

While in many cases students have already formed underground GSA clubs in Catholic schools across the country, the ability to meet is compromised when students cannot talk about it aloud.

“It’s important to have that support and have that community of people you know you can always go to when you’re having a bad day,” said Katie, a recent graduate of a high school where she helped found a GSA group. To avoid endangering the school’s accreditation, the Ballard News-Tribune is not naming the school.

Katie said she had a relatively positive experience when she came out as gay around the age of 15. Friends accepted her and her family caused no fuss, except her mom wanted her to stop dressing like a tomboy. When she showed up to chat with the Ballard News-Tribune, she was clad in jeans and a Russell Wilson #3 Seahawks Jersey.

“She got over that within a week,” Katie laughed. “I was totally fine.”

Still, when she did discover that she was gay, Katie said she didn’t know what to do, or who to go to.

“Finding students like you is just encouraging. It’s a scary time, 15 year old. I was raised Catholic. I went to Catholic since kindergarten. I just wasn’t educated,” Katie said.

She said the same is true of many LGBTQ freshmen and sophomores in Catholic school settings. Moreover, it was hard for the underground, unofficial GSA to find potentially LGBTQ students who were in need of help and support.

“It’s hard to get freshmen,” Katie recounted. “You really have to target them and say ‘Hey! I think you might be gay, join our group!’”

Furthermore, where they meet can be fluid. In the beginning at least, they met off campus a lot. Now the GSA will meet on campus, but it wouldn’t look like anything more than a group of people just hanging out and chatting after school in a classroom or in the cafeteria – and for all intents and purposes, that’s all it is.

“As unofficial as you could be,” Katie said.

Having an official GSA club would have a lot of benefits, Katie said.

“I think it would just help because it would be just like coming out. You can tell the school, you can do more school-wide things, things that would help like the day of silence, national coming out day,” she said. “You wouldn’t have to worry about somebody finding out and having (the club) shut down.”

Lastly, there is just something comforting about being able to relate to people the same age.

“People say, ‘Oh, you know you just go to one of the school counselors. But it’s just different to talk to some 30-someodd-year-old compared to a group of kids your own age,” Katie said.

To allow official GSA groups on Catholic campuses in Seattle, though, it’s not simply a matter of swaying the principal or the district. One has to get the blessing, so to speak, of the Seattle Archdiocese, Archbishop J. Peter Sartain.

To spread the word and attempt to put the pressure on Sartain, Katie and her friend Audrey, who is still in school, have started a Change.org petition and have lobbied to have people call and email Sartain.

So far the petition has reached 509 signatures. It can be found at http://www.change.org/petitions/archdiocese-of-seattle-allow-gay-straigh…

“I believe that everyone deserves the chance to be able to participate in school clubs, and the fact that so many teens in the Seattle area are being denied these rights is shameful,” reads a comment by Mariah DeWeese.

“I want my friends and peers to be able to feel proud to love who they love wherever they are, including at school. It’s as simple as that,” reads another, by Lynne Goodrich.

As of press time, Sartain has not given a response to either students or The Ballard News-Tribune on the matter.

Katie was understanding in that the Archdiocese is bound by his Catholicism and what is generally taught. But at the same time she said GSA members weren’t doing anything necessarily against the teachings.

Expressing a little of her frustration over the matter, Katie chalked it up as a form of discrimination.

“You can’t have a club because you’re gay,” Katie said. “It looks like discrimination. I don’t understand their reasoning.”

Still, Katie said that her experience being gay in a Catholic school was not all that dramatic. She never experienced any of the cruelty and gay bullying found in higher profile cases that have been spotlighted by the media around the country.

“Overall, I had a pretty positive experience with teachers and students,” she said. “There wasn’t a lot of hate. I wouldn’t even say there’s a lot of homophobia.”

Nonetheless, her positive experience could have been a lot worse if she didn’t find friends like Audrey.

“You need the support,” Katie said. “You need the openness.”

Follow Ballard News-Tribune on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ballardnewstrib

And Twitter at http://twitter.com/ballardnewstrib

Article source: http://www.ballardnewstribune.com/2013/09/11/news/lgbtq-catholic-school-students-fight-get-club-rec

Y offers after school programs for youth

The Cassville R-4 School District has partnered with the Cassville YMCA to offer an after school program at the Cassville Intermediate School.

The Cassville YMCA’s Primetime Program will begin immediately following the regular school day. Childcare services, which are for kindergarten through sixth grade students, will be offered until 5:45 p.m. each school day.

The Primetime Program will be structured using a schedule of events. Each afternoon will begin with snack time, and then children will have the opportunity to complete homework and receive tutoring services.

Organized games, crafts and free time activities will be offered after the homework and tutoring session.

“Activities will be based on the child’s age group,” said Chris Dunker, member support at the YMCA. “Students will also have free time to socialize and make friends in the program.”

A minimal cost will apply to the Primetime Program, but financial assistance will be available to families. Children who qualify for reduced lunches will automatically receive a 25 percent discount, and children who qualify for free lunches will receive a 50 percent discount. Families do not have to be YMCA members to participate in the program. financial assistance is available.

“It’s not too late to sign up,” Dunker said. “There is a non-refundable $20 registration fee that must accompany the registration.” Other fees apply, based on the number of days parents wish to have their child participate.

Parents interested in signing up for the Cassville YMCA’s Primetime Program should visit the Y on Highway 248 in Cassville or call 846-1535.

Article source: http://www.cassville-democrat.com/story/2000412.html

Green Bay YMCA Starts New After School Program – WGBA

Green Bay YMCA Starts New After School Program

CREATED 10:38 PM


  • e7cf7 1877542090 2647953388001 139C080E01284DDBB1B8D8112DCC9FA4 Green Bay YMCA Starts New After School Program   WGBA

    The Green Bay YMCA kicking off a new pilot after school program today at Eisenhower Elementary. Video by nbc26.com

    video

‘);
} else if($(this).data(“type”) == “ndn”) {
var ndnVideoId = $(this).attr(“id”).replace(“id-”,”");
$(this).parent(“li”).addClass(“active-video”).append(”);
} else if($(this).data(“type”) == “brightcove”) {
$(this).parent(“li”).addClass(“active-video”).append(”);
} else if($(this).data(“type”) == “brightcoveExt”) {
$(this).parent(“li”).addClass(“active-video”).append(”);
} else if($(this).data(“type”) == “vevo”) {
$(this).parent(“li”).addClass(“active-video”).append(”);
}
});
});
};
function checkWidth() {
var windowsize = $(window).width();
if (windowsize = 750) {
$(“.slider”).nanoslider({width:640,height:360});
} else {
$(“.slider .slides”).css({width:320,height:196});
$(“.slider .slides li”).css({width:320,height:196});
$(“.slider”).css(“width”,320);
$(“.slider”).nanoslider({width:320,height:196});
}
}
// Execute on load
checkWidth();


Green Bay, WI – The Green Bay YMCA started its after school pilot program on Tuesday at Eisenhower Elementary. It’s an academic and enrichment program for children in Kindergarten through 5th grade. Organizers hope the after school education will help kids do better in their regular classes. They offer a wide array of activities.

“Arts and science projects, we do gym games, and everything we do connects with the school. We have a very good partnership with the school and the district, and we serve the at risk kids here,” said Mandy Caldie, YMCA After-School Program Coordinator.

The new program also offers tutoring, college and career exploration, leadership development and arts education.

Article source: http://www.nbc26.com/news/Green-Bay-YMCA-Starts-New-After-School-Program-222286551.html

Wee Friends to Offer After-School Program

Wee Friends School and Day Camp will be offering an after-school program this fall.

The program designed for children in Kindergarten to sixth grade, will include adult supervision, homework help, arts and crafts, specialized programs, creative arts, tutoring and computer programs. 

Children in North Bellmore Schools can also be bused from their schools to the facility. 

Wee Friends is located in the building that formally housed Jacob Gunther Elementary School, which shuttered in 2012. Wee Friends focuses on pre-education and care and has facilities in both Merrick and Wantagh. 

For more information call Wee Friends at (516) 781-8800

Article source: http://bellmore.patch.com/groups/schools/p/wee-friends-to-offer-afterschool-program

page 1 of 14»
GET The Facts FREE...
Instant Access to The DC !
Get Up to .....
Email: *
First:
Last:
Verify:
Recent Comments

    Welcome , today is Sunday, April 20, 2014