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Kumon Opens After-School Enrichment Program in Tarrytown


Written by River Journal Tarrytown


Saturday, 14 September 2013

Entrepreneur Brings Passion for Education to Community. Kumon, the world’s largest after-school math and reading enrichment program, opens a center in Tarrytown between Dixon Street and Central Avenue.  Kumon of Tarrytown invites the public to attend the new business Grand Opening Ribbon Cutting Event on Saturday, September 21, 2013 and meet local educator and entrepreneur, Lillian Brijeski.

Kumon’s individualized approach helps children progress by ability rather than age or grade. In the U.S., 250,000 students from preschool to high school are developing their math and reading skills independently and gaining confidence through Kumon’s Method of Learning.  The Kumon Center of Tarrytown joins the more than 1,300 U.S. instructors committed to helping children excel through the ability-based program.

Ribbon Cutting Event:
Saturday, September 21, 2013
3:00 pm
61 N. Broadway between Dixon Street Central Ave

In a report published in Education Next, “Teaching Math to the Talented,” American students were significantly outperformed by 33 countries including Taiwan, Hong Kong, South Korea, and Finland. America’s lack of advanced students impacts the country’s future economic growth, which is why Brijeski cares deeply about helping Sleepy Hollow and Tarrytown students achieve
academic success in her after-school enrichment program. More than half of U.S. Kumon students study advanced math, and 24 percent of these students are learning materials two to three years above their grade level.

Instructor Brijeski saw her own children develop a love of learning in Kumon, as well as discipline, accuracy, and mastery. As a result of Brijeski’s children’s success, she was inspired to open her own franchise.  Prior to opening Kumon of Tarrytown, Lillian spent over twelve years teaching in elementary schools in Brooklyn, Armonk and Pleasantville.

Kumon of Tarrytown class hours are: Mondays and Wednesdays from 3:30 to 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. Students study for approximately a half-hour per subject at 61 N. Broadway, Tarrytown, NY and have short assignments to complete at home.

For more information, or to schedule a free placement test, please call 914-829-5288 or email LillianBrijeski@ikumon.com. For more details, visit www.kumonoftarrytown.com.


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Article source: http://www.riverjournalonline.com/schools/2957-kumon-opens-after-school-enrichment-program-in-tarrytown.html

Kumon Opens After-School Enrichment Program in Tarrytown


Written by River Journal Tarrytown


Saturday, 14 September 2013

Entrepreneur Brings Passion for Education to Community. Kumon, the world’s largest after-school math and reading enrichment program, opens a center in Tarrytown between Dixon Street and Central Avenue.  Kumon of Tarrytown invites the public to attend the new business Grand Opening Ribbon Cutting Event on Saturday, September 21, 2013 and meet local educator and entrepreneur, Lillian Brijeski.

Kumon’s individualized approach helps children progress by ability rather than age or grade. In the U.S., 250,000 students from preschool to high school are developing their math and reading skills independently and gaining confidence through Kumon’s Method of Learning.  The Kumon Center of Tarrytown joins the more than 1,300 U.S. instructors committed to helping children excel through the ability-based program.

Ribbon Cutting Event:
Saturday, September 21, 2013
3:00 pm
61 N. Broadway between Dixon Street Central Ave

In a report published in Education Next, “Teaching Math to the Talented,” American students were significantly outperformed by 33 countries including Taiwan, Hong Kong, South Korea, and Finland. America’s lack of advanced students impacts the country’s future economic growth, which is why Brijeski cares deeply about helping Sleepy Hollow and Tarrytown students achieve
academic success in her after-school enrichment program. More than half of U.S. Kumon students study advanced math, and 24 percent of these students are learning materials two to three years above their grade level.

Instructor Brijeski saw her own children develop a love of learning in Kumon, as well as discipline, accuracy, and mastery. As a result of Brijeski’s children’s success, she was inspired to open her own franchise.  Prior to opening Kumon of Tarrytown, Lillian spent over twelve years teaching in elementary schools in Brooklyn, Armonk and Pleasantville.

Kumon of Tarrytown class hours are: Mondays and Wednesdays from 3:30 to 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. Students study for approximately a half-hour per subject at 61 N. Broadway, Tarrytown, NY and have short assignments to complete at home.

For more information, or to schedule a free placement test, please call 914-829-5288 or email LillianBrijeski@ikumon.com. For more details, visit www.kumonoftarrytown.com.


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Article source: http://www.riverjournalonline.com/schools/2957-kumon-opens-after-school-enrichment-program-in-tarrytown.html

Register for Boys & Girls Clubs of Union County afterschool programs

The Boys Girls Clubs of Union County offers NJ State licensed after school program for children enrolled in grades K-five. The Boys Girls Clubs of Union County After School Program is designed to enrich the social, emotional, physical and intellectual development of school age children. This program is offered to children.

Participants must be enrolled in at least kindergarten. We are open from September-June and follow the public school schedule.

Program Objectives:
• To provide an environment of social adjustment in a peer group setting.
• To assist in the development of self-awareness and independent thought.
• To instill a sense of positive self image within each of our children.
• To promote development of physical skills through activities requiring coordination and motivation.

Daily Program:
Includes outdoor and indoor active play, arts crafts, snack, activity time, computer and homework time, special events, etc.

The programs are a offered Monday – Friday, from 2:30-6:30 p.m., at the Club locations in Union, Elizabeth, Plainfield, Hillside, Roselle and Linden.

The Boys Girls Clubs of Union County will continue to implement “Power Hour” at the 6 Boys Girls Club after school programs on a daily basis.

This highly successful homework assistance program, helps young people come to view homework as an opportunity to learn to work independently, complete projects on time and feel positive about their accomplishments.

“We are grateful to Boys Girls Clubs of America for enabling us to continue utilizing such a high-quality homework assistance program like Power Hour,” Russell Triolo, Chief Executive Officer of the Boys Girls Clubs of Union County. “So many of the children we serve simply do not have access to the resources necessary for successful homework completion, which is critical to their everyday academic success.”

Power Hour: Making Minutes Count is an interactive, after-school homework assistance program for children ages 6 to 18. Unlike assignments done in class, Power Hour work is conducted in a non-threatening and fun after-school environment using adults or older students, who serve as “Homework Helpers,” to supervise completion of Club members’ homework.

In addition to homework help, these staff or volunteers offer age-appropriate activities to stimulate Club members’ interest in learning. By explaining the relevance of learning fractions in order to cook a meal, for example, or by showing how geography can enable us to enjoy reading the newspaper, volunteers help Club members learn to value the knowledge homework can bring. Power Hour’s long-term goals are to ensure that youth graduate from high school, pursue postsecondary educations and become life-long learners.

In addition to “Homework Helpers,” Power Hour offers tips for establishing essential communication with teachers and parents. Research has shown that parental involvement is a must if children are to develop good homework habits. Power Hour also provides incentives for Club members, rewarding them with “Power Points” and charting their academic progress on a colorful poster that is displayed prominently in the Club.

Among the available research on the importance of after-school homework assistance is a recent study conducted by the U.S. Justice and Education Departments. In Working for Children: Safe and Smart After-School Programs , experts reported, “children who are left alone when school ends have more difficulties with their class work than those who participate in after-school programs. Not only is the latter group of students more likely to succeed academically, they are also much more self-confident.” Other studies have linked after-school homework assistance programs to improved behavior at school and an overall increased interest in learning.

The Boys Girls Clubs of Union County, which operates facilities in Union, Roselle, Plainfield, Elizabeth and Hillside and Linden serves over 7,500 children. They seek to inspire and enable young people, who need them most, to realize their full potential and have provided opportunity for youth since 1955. They are part of a national network of some 4,000 neighborhood-based facilities, Boys Girls Clubs of America, which serves more than 4.6 million young people annually, in all 50 states and on U.S. military bases worldwide.

Known as “The Positive Place for Kids,” the Clubs provide guidance-oriented character development programs on a daily basis for children 6-18 years old, conducted by a full-time professional staff. Key Boys Girls Club programs emphasize leadership development, education and career exploration, financial literacy, health and life skills, the arts, sports, fitness and recreation, and family outreach.

To find out more about registering for our afterschool child care programs and the many year round youth development programs offered by BGCUC, visit bgcuc.org or call 908-687-7976 ext. 1 or 908-687-2697 ext. 102

Article source: http://www.nj.com/suburbannews/index.ssf/2013/09/register_for_boys_girls_clubs_2.html

Crazy 88 Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Announces After School Pick-Up for Clemens …

  •  Crazy 88 Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Announces After School Pick Up for Clemens ...


738c0 gI 132369 kids Crazy 88 Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Announces After School Pick Up for Clemens ...

Crazy 88 students excel both on and off the mats.

“With the new approach to the program I know the kids will be nothing but successful this year.”

- Timothy Spriggs, After School Instructor

Baltimore, MD (PRWEB) September 06, 2013

Crazy 88 Brazilian Jiu Jitsu has announced that they are currently picking up students from Clemens Crossing Elementary School located in Columbia, Maryland.

Crazy 88 Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a professional Mixed Martial Arts academy located in Elkridge, MD. The academy currently offers a variety of classes and programs including Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Kickboxing, Womens Only classes, as well a Kids Program.

The kids martial arts program offers classes for children ages 3 to 14 years old. Classes are divided into Tiny Ninjas (3-5), Little Ninjas (6-9), Juniors (10-13) and Teens (14-17). The program covers both Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai, with the curriculum being catered to each specific age group.

The after school program focuses not only on martial arts success, but also academic success. This year the program at Crazy 88 is being structured to involve more emphasis on school and academic activities in addition to Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai training.

Kids Program and After School Instructor, Timothy Spriggs said, “We want our students to be stars on and off the mats. It’s important that we’re helping them excel in school and in their martial arts training.”

Spriggs continued on to say, “We made a lot of changes to the program. With the new approach to the program I know the kids will be nothing but successful this year.”

Transportation is provided from the child’s school to the academy. The program consists of homework and other educational activities as well as life skills lessons. The students participate in a martial arts class to focus on physical health, self-defense and to build confidence.

To learn more about the programs offered at Crazy 88 – Elkridge visit http://www.BaltimoreMixedMartialArts.com or call (443) 283-1450. For more information about Crazy 88 – Owings Mills visit http://www.Baltimore-MMA.com or call (410) 999-1064.

Clemens Crossing Elementary is located at 10320 Quarterstaff Road, Columbia, MD 21044.

 Crazy 88 Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Announces After School Pick Up for Clemens ...


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Article source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/9/prweb11081720.htm

Elkridge Elementary School Included in After-School Pick-Up by Crazy 88 …

  •  Elkridge Elementary School Included in After School Pick Up by Crazy 88 ...


d0a87 gI 132369 kids Elkridge Elementary School Included in After School Pick Up by Crazy 88 ...

Crazy 88 students excel both on and off the mats.

“We want our students to be stars on and off the mats.”

- Timothy Spriggs, After School Instructor

Baltimore, MD (PRWEB) September 03, 2013

Crazy 88 Brazilian Jiu Jitsu has announced that they are currently picking up students from Elkridge Elementary School located in Elkridge, Maryland.

Crazy 88 Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a professional Mixed Martial Arts academy located in Elkridge, MD. The academy currently offers a variety of classes and programs including Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Kickboxing, Womens Only classes, as well a Kids Program.

The kids martial arts program offers classes for children ages 3 to 14 years old. Classes are divided into Tiny Ninjas (3-5), Little Ninjas (6-9), Juniors (10-13) and Teens (14-17). The program covers both Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai, with the curriculum being catered to each specific age group.

The after school program focuses not only on martial arts success, but also academic success. This year the program at Crazy 88 is being structured to involve more emphasis on school and academic activities in addition to Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai training.

Kids Program and After School Instructor, Timothy Spriggs said, “We want our students to be stars on and off the mats. It’s important that we’re helping them excel in school and in their martial arts training.”

Spriggs continued on to say, “We made a lot of changes to the program. With the new approach to the program I know the kids will be nothing but successful this year.”

Transportation is provided from the child’s school to the academy. The program consists of homework and other educational activities as well as life skills lessons. The students participate in a martial arts class to focus on physical health, self-defense and to build confidence.

To learn more about the programs offered at Crazy 88 – Elkridge visit http://www.BaltimoreMixedMartialArts.com or call (443) 283-1450. For more information about Crazy 88 – Owings Mills visit http://www.Baltimore-MMA.com or call (410) 999-1064.

Elkridge Elementary school is located at 7075 Montgomery Road, Elkridge, Maryland 21075.

 Elkridge Elementary School Included in After School Pick Up by Crazy 88 ...


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Article source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/9/prweb11081723.htm

As school starts, Michigan’s teacher of the year offers lessons in learning

Perched atop hastily erected towers of dried spaghetti, three marshmallows began to wobble.

On this day, surrounded by stacks of books in the library of Grosse Pointe North High School, Michigan Teacher of the Year Gary Abud had handed out tape, string, dried pasta and a challenge to nearly a dozen newly minted teachers: Erect a spaghetti tower that can hold a marshmallow.

This wasn’t a lesson about gravity or the fortitude of dried noodles.

?
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Rather, Michigan’s top educator was teaching about lifelong learning, respect, and about letting go — lessons as relevant to those in front of classrooms as they are to those packing lunches or stepping onto a school bus today.

An estimated 1.5 million Michigan students and 100,000 teachers head back to the classroom in the state’s public schools this morning, with a familiar mix of excitement, anxiety, and anticipatory tiredness as they face a new load of classes, homework, sports and carpools.

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“There’s this marvelous phenomenon where we get to start over again every year,” said Kate Murray, North’s principal. “It’s a clean slate, a fresh start. The students get to re-create the academic success they’ve strived for and … teachers have the opportunity to become a better educator.”

In the library last month, Abud watched. The teachers asked for advice in erecting their pasta. Abud, 29, offered nothing.

Students often approach the classroom as they might a bank transaction, seeing a teacher as a “ ‘bank of knowledge, and I’m here to make a withdrawal,’ ” Abud said later.

But the world today isn’t just about collecting information; it’s about applying it, he said.

As it turned out, two of the three teams spent so much time settling on a building plan that they ran out of time for careful construction. Spaghetti towers crashed to the tabletops.

But a third group went to work almost immediately — a team in perpetual motion as they assessed the tower’s strength as it grew and redesigned it when it wobbled with more tape here or an extra strand of spaghetti there.

Their pasta tower — soft white gob on top — stood stable at 47 1/2 centimeters tall. Abud congratulated their teamwork.

This, he believes: Life is a discussion, not a lecture.

Likewise, it is effort that defines a person rather than a grade or any other single point in time, said Abud, a half-marathoner who paces at times and pokes the air in front of him as he punctuates his points.

“We have to be in a growth mindset,” he said. “This is not a fixed world. It’s about moving forward.”

For Abud, the path to teaching began here at North. He was in high school here where he faced the worst of keratoconus, a progressive disease that was snuffing out his vision. Eventually, surgeries saved his vision, and Abud began training as a doctor.

A love for tutoring and teaching piano and spinning classes derailed those plans, luring him toward a classroom in 2008 where he could still fulfill a passion to help others. It took time to adjust. Former teachers were now coworkers with first names. His former English teacher is the principal.

“I had some moments,” he said, chuckling.

In the library on this day, Abud set a scene for these new teachers: A teen girl sneaks out of her house at night, visiting a forbidden boyfriend. They fight; she goes to a sister’s house and is turned away. A coffee shop owner turns her away as well. As she crosses the street, she is killed by a drunk driver.

Who is most to blame for her death?

The teachers in the library talked street lights, curfews, legal issues and family obligations. They scrunched up their faces. Shook their heads. Talked over each other — and at each other.

The drunk was drunk. Family members hadn’t protected her. And there was this from math teacher Eric Vanston, 26: “Nobody deserves to die and I realize I’m sounding insensitive…But if she wasn’t there, she wouldn’t be dead.”

The right answer? There isn’t one. Rather, the lesson was reasoning, articulating and considering others’ ideas, Abud said.

The group had concluded that the drunk was most to blame. His high school students usually decide the teen is most to blame.

“Consensus doesn’t mean you agree. It’s ‘I don‘t agree, but I can see your point.’ ”

Get hold of yourself, and say ‘I can.’

To whom was the poet writing?

It was Abud’s last lesson and library chairs were bunched in a discussion circle. This time, the teachers spoke one at a time. They listened. They built on each others’ opinions.

And that was the lesson. Teaching is also about giving others room to explore and to grow. Teaching is learning, too, by watching the process unfold, Abud said.

“Face it,” Abud said, “Nobody wants to be talked to.”

Article source: http://www.freep.com/article/20130903/NEWS06/309030016/Michigan-s-teacher-of-the-year-offers-lessons-in-learning-other-advice-as-school-year-kicks-off

YMCA afterschool programs provide learning activities


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The Sussex County YMCA is offering an afterschool program to school-aged children in Blairstown, Franklin, and Hardyston to help motivate and inspire children to learn.

Providing youth with opportunities to continue to learn and engage in meaningful activities at the end of the school day can boost their academic success. The Y’s afterschool program combines academics with play and offers a caring and safe environment for youth who could otherwise be left unsupervised.

During the school year, 15.1 million U.S. children are left unsupervised after 3 p.m., according to the Afterschool Alliance, a nonprofit public awareness advocacy organization. In New Jersey, 28 percent of children are left alone and responsible for taking care of themselves. With the start of the new school year, the Sussex County YMCA encourages parents and caregivers to make sure children are involved in safe, educational experiences after school.

“The combination of enrichment and extended learning opportunities is essential to increasing children’s success in school,” said Jennifer Gardner, executive director of the Sussex County YMCA. “YMCA afterschool programs promote a love for learning, social and emotional development, healthy choices, character and creativity, and provide children with an extra support system through positive role models to help them achieve and reach their full potential.”

Studies show participation in afterschool programs helps boost school attendance and academic performance and reduces gaps in academic achievement. Consistent quality care for all children daily helps provide every child to be successful, happy and healthy.

The Sussex County YMCA’s afterschool program offers help with homework, Healthy U Program and sports and enrichment activities. Financial assistance is available to those in need to ensure every child and teen has the opportunity to learn and grow at the Y.

For more information about the Sussex County YMCA’s afterschool program, please contact Samantha Walter, School Age Child Care and Sports Enrichment Director, at 973.209.9622 or visit sussexcountyymca.org.


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Article source: http://advertisernewssouth.com/article/20130828/NEWS01/130829951/YMCA-afterschool-programs-provide-learning-activities

YMCA afterschool programs provide learning activities


<!––>



Make text smaller
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The Sussex County YMCA is offering an afterschool program to school-aged children in Blairstown, Franklin, and Hardyston to help motivate and inspire children to learn.

Providing youth with opportunities to continue to learn and engage in meaningful activities at the end of the school day can boost their academic success. The Y’s afterschool program combines academics with play and offers a caring and safe environment for youth who could otherwise be left unsupervised.

During the school year, 15.1 million U.S. children are left unsupervised after 3 p.m., according to the Afterschool Alliance, a nonprofit public awareness advocacy organization. In New Jersey, 28 percent of children are left alone and responsible for taking care of themselves. With the start of the new school year, the Sussex County YMCA encourages parents and caregivers to make sure children are involved in safe, educational experiences after school.

“The combination of enrichment and extended learning opportunities is essential to increasing children’s success in school,” said Jennifer Gardner, executive director of the Sussex County YMCA. “YMCA afterschool programs promote a love for learning, social and emotional development, healthy choices, character and creativity, and provide children with an extra support system through positive role models to help them achieve and reach their full potential.”

Studies show participation in afterschool programs helps boost school attendance and academic performance and reduces gaps in academic achievement. Consistent quality care for all children daily helps provide every child to be successful, happy and healthy.

The Sussex County YMCA’s afterschool program offers help with homework, Healthy U Program and sports and enrichment activities. Financial assistance is available to those in need to ensure every child and teen has the opportunity to learn and grow at the Y.

For more information about the Sussex County YMCA’s afterschool program, please contact Samantha Walter, School Age Child Care and Sports Enrichment Director, at 973.209.9622 or visit sussexcountyymca.org.


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Article source: http://spartaindependent.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20130826/NEWS01/130829965/YMCA-afterschool-programs-provide-learning-activities

YMCA afterschool programs provide learning activities

1 day, 19 hours ago by Denise Donley

Providing youth with opportunities to continue to learn and engage in meaningful activities at the end of the school day can boost their academic success. To help motivate and inspire kids to learn, the Quincy Family YMCA is offering an afterschool program to school-aged children throughout Quincy. The Y’s afterschool program combines academics with play and offers a caring and safe environment for youth who would otherwise be left unsupervised.

During the school year, 15.1 million U.S. children are left unsupervised after 3 p.m., according to the Afterschool Alliance, a nonprofit public awareness advocacy organization. In Illinois, 28% of children are left alone and responsible for taking care of themselves. With the start of the new school year, the Quincy Family YMCA encourages parents/caregivers to make sure that children are involved in safe, educational experiences after school.

“The combination of enrichment and extended learning opportunities is essential to increasing children’s success in school,” said Michelle Terwelp, Marketing Director, Quincy Family YMCA. “YMCA afterschool programs promote a love for learning, social and emotional development, healthy choices, character and creativity, and provide children with an extra support system through positive role models to help them achieve and reach their full potential.”

Studies show participation in afterschool programs helps boost school attendance and academic performance and reduces gaps in academic achievement among children from disadvantaged households.

In the Quincy Family YMCA’s afterschool program youth receive help with homework or tutoring from our counselors and can also explore hands-on science, math and writing activities, recreational and daily fitness activities, and arts and crafts. Financial assistance is available to those in need, to ensure every child and teen has the opportunity to learn and grow at the Y.

For more information about the Quincy Family YMCA’s afterschool program, please contact Bethany Nannen Miller, Aquatics Day Camp Director, at (217) 222-9622 or visit quincyymca.net.

Article source: http://quincyjournal.com/up,-down-and-around-town/2013/08/18/ymca-afterschool-programs-provide-learning-activities/

After School Program Registration Now Open

SHELTON — The Boys and Girls Club of the Lower Naugatuck Valley’s after-school program registration is currently open for the 2013 to 2014 school year.

Children signed up as members may be transported to the Clubhouse by Shelton public schools including Booth Hill, Elizabeth Shelton, Long Hill, Mohegan, Perry Hill, Shelton Intermediate and Sunnyside.

Club members from Shelton High, St. Joseph’s in Shelton, Derby Public Schools and Seymour Public Schools have the option of signing up for van service.

Parents requiring van service must complete their children’s online registration by Tuesday, August 20, and come in to the Clubhouse to complete the van registration and make payment by Friday, August 23.

Registrations processed after Tuesday, August 20, will not be on the van roster until the second week of school.

Parents not requiring van service may register until Wednesday, August 28. The Clubhouse will be closed from Monday, August 26, through Friday, August 30.

Membership fees cover participation in the Club’s core programs of academic success, good character, citizenship and healthy lifestyles. Additional fees apply to snow days, holidays, school vacations, sports leagues, summer camp and special events.

After-school program membership starts on the first day of school in Shelton and ends on Shelton’s last day of school.

Membership is open to children between 6 and 18 years old of all ethnicities, races and creeds. Trained professional staff provide our members with positive adult mentors and role models.

Those seeking registration or additional information may visit www.BGC-LNV.org.

Article source: http://www.voicesnews.com/articles/2013/08/17/community_news/doc520e468cca1f3737417158.txt

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